10 Forex Misconceptions - ReiseNews

Why some people relapse after 90/180/360 days + The Tapering Strategy

Hello. I’ve been inspired to write this short message on why some people relapse because of a recent post I read from a very frustrated young man here on noFap, and I’ll also share with you a unique strategy commonly used in alcoholic patients that you may find helpful. So, without further ado, here we go:
Why do some people relapse after 90/180/360 days?
You’d think that a guy who makes it to 90 days would be free from PMO forever, right? Well, based on the amount of reports we’re seeing here on noFap, it’s fairly obvious that some people who reach three, six, even twelve months of hard mode fall back into the habit. Most of the reasons given is that urges suddenly “creeps up on them”, usually during a “bad day”.
In my opinion, the main reason for this is a misconception of how the body works during addiction recovery. You’ve probably seen that famous Lord Of The Rings noFap poster that features old-Theoden as Day 0, then new-Theoden as day 20, then Aragorn as day 40, the grey-Gandalf as Day 60, then white-Gandalf as Day 90. It’s all very inspiring, but this is absolute hogwash because it pretends that addiction recovery is a linear progress like this:
Diagram of noFap progress as linear
Basically, the claim is that if you start noFap, then the superpowers will just keep on growing nonstop, forever, past 90 days and onward. This is impossible! No matter what you do, a human being simply cannot keep maturing at a constant pace. It will have to pull back eventually and regroup, making it seem as if noFap has suddenly stopped working, when in fact the body and brain are just taking a break to get ready for another surge. Rather than a straight line, PMO recovery actually looks more like this:
Diagram of noFap progress as bouncing
If you think this is far out, take a look at the stock/forex/indices markets:
Diagram of the S&P with the same principle
In the example above, the S&P is clearly dominating, but notice that it keeps bouncing up and down in a zigzag pattern despite a general uptrend. A poor trader zooms in only in that particular moment and think that the downward bounce is indicative that the S&P is finally going to fail. If he bet money on it, he’d be broke by now. Every bounce downward is only TEMPORARY. If you zoom out and see the big picture, you’ll clearly notice that the general trend is still going upward.
Same with noFap. After 30 days, the body will stop producing superpowers, and your self esteem will drop. If you focus only on that moment, you might think that noFap is a failure and will likely relapse. However, if you hold on, you’ll soon figure out that the body was simply SHORING UP RESOURCES to resume for ANOTHER PUSH upward, just like when the ocean has to pull back in order to make a bigger tide. You’d have wasted a month if you gave in to the temporary lapse when nothing is happening!
The Tapering Strategy
For severe PMO addicts, I'd like to share a strategy that I learned back in my days working at a rehab clinic. Basically, some alcoholics are so addicted that a sudden cold turkey (i.e. quitting outright) will lead to the body reacting so violently that it will often cause the patient to have seizures and die. Obviously, PMO doesn’t cause us to die when we stop, but the withdrawal symptoms for some will be so harsh that it would feel like dying, so they relapse. What’s the solution?
Taper it!
What the alcoholics are usually advised is to slowly ratchet down the amount of drinks they take. They can still drink, only that the amount will decrease by minute portions everyday until it finally drops to zero. This way, the body can adjust normally, and the willpower to quit won’t suddenly give out. Applying that to noFap, here’s what it might look like:
Day 1 – PMO as much as you like
Day 2 – Break
Day 3 – PMO as much as you like
Day 4 – Break
Day 5 – Break
Day 6 – PMO as much as you like
Day 7 – Break
Day 8 – Break
Day 9 – Break
Day 10 – PMO as much as you like
…and so on.
This might seem counterintuitive, but you are able to train your willpower by slowly ratcheting up the challenge rather than biting on a piece of stick and going 90-days hard mode at once. I don’t care who you are, you can certainly do one day of no PMO! And after you’ve had your “fix”, you can try to do two days clean. Then get your “fix” again, then do three days clean, and so on, until the intervals between sessions grow wide enough as to render PMO irrelevant. This way, the addiction becomes much more managable to kick.
Of course, it’s not a guarantee of success, but who knows? If you're a hard case PMO addict, give it a try!
I hope you like my post. Long Live and Prosper!
TL;DR noFap works in a zigzag pattern, not a linear progression. Also, you might want to space out your PMO rather than go cold turkey.
submitted by chevalier6 to NoFap [link] [comments]

Why GVT isn't what you Think

I’ve seen a lot of posts on here as of late talking about GVT’s potential as a trading platform, and while that’s great and all, I’m here to tell you that’s not how this thing is going to play out in the long run. In the recent Medium article entitled “94,000 — Genesis Vision Token (GVT)” the author makes the case for a $94,000 GVT token by 2021. He made many good points, but there is one critical error he and most of the people in this community keep making. Day traders RARELY OUTPERFORM INVESTORS in the long run. The author based this argument on the assumption that, “a growth rate of 11.06% per week is sustainable in the future,” even saying it was, “VERY conservative.” Recently, I’ve have been seeing a bunch of posts and comments suggesting growth rates like this are reasonable, and I want to explain to everyone why it won’t happen.
1) Firstly, let’s address the results of the trader’s challenge. Yes, I understand what you’re thinking, “But the top five all had over 400% returns!” This is true, but if you took those same top five traders and had them repeat the challenge every week for the next year most would return to near the mean of the market. Even while monitoring the tournament I saw several traders go from top 5, 300% returns, to losses in less than 24 hours. For every trader that made ridiculous returns there were just as many losses, and you won’t be able to “pick the winners” because there will be different winners every period. It’s true that there will be some day traders that are able to outperform the market consistently, but after transaction costs and fees to manage, the best you could expect is a couple percent above market average. Here’s some evidence:
http://technicalanalysis.org.uk/support-and-resistance/Curcio-etal1997.pdf (Found it extremely difficult to outperform foreign currency exchange markets)
http://viking.som.yale.edu/will/research.papers/day-trading-international-3-15-00.pdf (Found that some traders were able to outperform market by roughly 20%, which is significant, but that’s likely a 1-1.5% increase in returns per year, before accounting for managing fees.)
https://www.cfapubs.org/doi/sum/10.2469/faj.v59.n6.2578 (this study gives hope, finds it possible to day trade profitably, but again I question what the results would’ve been over a longer time frame)
2) Here’s what I will concede to those of you hoping for magical 11% returns per week (which by the way would turn 5k into over a million in less than a year). The cryptocurrency market is wild right now, and if 2018 picks back up and looks anything like 2017, you could expect massive returns, possibly even in the 1000s %. Additionally, wall street hasn’t entered the game yet, so for now, there is still room to take advantage of market irrationality. But trust me, when million-dollar algorithms (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2u007Msq1qo) are generating trades across the block from Coinbase or Binance every few milliseconds, there will be little room for day traders in the space. So, it isn’t that you can’t make money or even outperform the market, but it just won’t be as crazy and advantageous as you think.
3) This brings me to point three; the real value of GVT. Genesis Vision will do two things extremely well, it gives access to exposure from a wide variety of markets from one platform (cryptos, forex, Nasdaq, etc.), and it ensures trust. I personally am most excited about the wide access to markets through knowledgeable managers. I know nothing about technology stocks, but if I want exposure in that market, I can find a manager experienced in that area who is up to date on the latest news. The same goes for crypto. I found out about NANO at around a $1.50 and did well because of it, but my dad (who knows little about crypto and mostly owns the Coinbase coins) never had a chance. Now, he will be able to tie his capital to someone deeply involved in daily news and analysis in the crypto world, which as I’m sure many of us know, can feel like a full-time job. So, when fundamentals change, or new technology arrives on the scene, he isn’t late to the party. Then there is the aspect of trust. Users can verify that traders are handling their money correctly and legitimately generating the returns they are claiming. This could be huge in private equity markets if Genesis Vision really takes hold.
Sorry for the long post, but I just wanted to clear up a lot of the misconceptions flying around this sub. Sure there will be a place for day trading on GVT, but its real breakthroughs are easy access to markets through knowledgeable managers and trust. Also, I'm interested to hear your arguments because I am by no means an expert and I'm sure people will have a lot of stuff to disagree with me on.
submitted by poopinacan22 to genesisvision [link] [comments]

Misconceptions about gilsellers/RMT

I've been wanting to write a post like this for a while, but never really had the time to do it. Since the early maintenance is upon us, I figure now is as good a time as any to put this out there.
There seems to be a lot of misconceptions and/or ideas about how the whole gilselling/RMT system works. As a businessman, I like to look into how things work and how things operate. I travel extensively into China/Asia, and I've actually seen how some of these operations work, and some of you might be surprised. While some of you have a good idea about what goes on, this is just to inform some of you guys that think all RMT are chinese kids that need rice to eat for the evening.
As a side note: I do not participate in RMT, nor have a bought gil. From a business standpoint, RMT is a very real and lucrative business, and knowing how it works intrigues me. I guess I should put this in here too since I'm getting called out for "generalizing the ins and outs of gilfarming." This is in no way how ALL RMT works. Like any business, there are those that find different routes to earn money. There are some willing to work harder than others, and there are those who like to get others to do the work for them. This post a just a basic framework of how most RMT work.
False. From a business standpoint, putting a bunch of computers in a room and paying for a subscription for each one makes no sense. Besides the cost for all these computers, there would be a cost for each subscription. Most of these guys that start RMT do not have that kind of cash.
Well, the basic way that these guys do it is to get others to farm for them, and the RMT buys the gil off those players. Confused? Ok, RMT company, lets name it GIL4SALE is offering to buy gil at a rate of $10usd per million gil. Player A sees this and starts to use bots to farm shards and sell them on the market board. Assuming Player A makes 10 million gil a day farming shards, he now sells the 10 million to GIL4SALE and makes $100usd. This goes on for a few days before Player A gets banned, and has probably made enough to get a new account to do it all over again.
Player B doesn't have the balls to run bots like Player A, but what he does have is a level 50 crafter in all crafts. So Player B starts crafting to earn a fortune to turn into real money. The chances he gets caught are a lot less, but it takes him more time to earn the same amount as Player A.
Player C was a regular player, but saw GIL4SALE's advertisement, and decides he might as well make a little side cash while playing a game. Player C has a level 50 PLD with a static group that can get through all content in the game. Figures that if he and his group sells wins for hard fights, they can all make some real life money.
Before some of you guys get all defensive about titan sells and whatnot, this is just a general overview on how it works. Not saying all people selling wins or selling high priced crafted gear are gilsellers, but there are some.
You're overthinking it. RMT doesn't give two shits about the economy of a game. They are in it for the pure purpose of making real money. They go where the money is, and right now, the money is in FFXIV. People are willing to buy, and that's all they care about. There is no ulterior motive to sabotage your economy.
Most of these bots and hacks are made by regular players. Not the RMT themselves. Regular players search for these bots and hacks and run them to earn gil so they can in turn, sell them to the RMT company. There are people that buy the game just for the purpose of making real money. OK to clarify, I'm not debating the fact that larger RMT companies use more sophisticated methods like bot swarms/farms. There are definitely more shady RMT companies that have their own methods of obtaining gil, but this is more of a basic framework of how RMT works.
Here's an interesting little story. I travel to China several times a year to buy goods and import them. Some of the places I go, they look like giant shopping centers with rows and rows of stalls selling goods. Every floor has 50-100 stalls, and each building has 5-10 floors. Each stall has a worker who sits there waiting for customers every day. It gets boring for them, so they have a laptop to keep them entertained. Some of them use the laptop to watch TV. Some use it to do business (online sales). Some of them play MMOs like LoL and WoW. I didn't think much of it until I started to see these guys running bots in the background while they were talking to me. These guys were making side cash by playing video games, and a lot of them were doing it. They do it pretty much for the sole purpose of making extra money.
There are a lot of these RMT companies, and many of them are chinese owned (since the laws are extremely lax there), but many of the ones selling gil to the RMT companies are from all over. US, EU, JP...everywhere. There are always going to be people looking for a way to make a quick buck. If they can make it while playing a video game...hey, thats even better. This is why SE takes so long to ban RMT and they ban them in waves. There are a lot more people behind it than the ones shouting advertisements.
submitted by AlwaysMischievous to ffxiv [link] [comments]

WolfpackBOT - The world's fastest and most secure trading bot

WolfpackBOT - The world's fastest and most secure trading bot

https://preview.redd.it/n7wutgsuzfd21.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=d0dac7147b8e70584305f997732a248d6b088ff9

INTRODUCTION

Cryptocurrency is essentially digital money traded from one person to another through the use of pseudonyms. There are no intermediaries like banks, no governmental oversight or authority, and no fees. The “crypto” in cryptocurrency refers to the use of cryptography to ensure the security and privacy of every transaction.
New coins are created through a technique called mining. The process requires powerful computers that solve complex math problems. Each problem should take about 10 minutes to solve, and results in the creation of a predetermined number of coins. The total number of coins that can be created is fixed — there’s a limit of 21 million bitcoins that can be created. The number of coins rewarded for solving each problem dwindles as time goes on.
Bitcoin is believed to have been created in 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto, an enigmatic figure who has so far proven all but impossible to definitively identify. By using cryptography to control the creation and tracking of a digital currency, Nakamoto took that power away from central authorities like governments.
Bitcoin was the first and most famous digital currency, but you can choose from more than 1,500, including ether, litecoin and even cryptokitties. For awhile, you saw these currencies only in the darkest corners of the internet, where people used them for all sorts of questionable, even illegal, activities. Drug dealers liked them because they made transactions all but invisible, and trolls at the Kremlin-backed Internet Research Agency used bitcoin to finance their campaign to influence the 2016 election.
That started to change in 2014, when Overstock became the first major US retailer to accept bitcoin. Companies like Expedia and Microsoft followed suit.
One of the biggest misconceptions about cryptocurrencies is that you need thousands of dollars to invest. It’s an easy assumption to make, especially in the case of bitcoin, which stayed under $1,000 from about 2010 to 2017. But then it took off, surpassing thousand-dollar milestones at a pace that seemed quicker than you could refresh your phone.
The staggering value is off-putting to many. But unlike most stocks, you can buy a fraction of a bitcoin so you don’t need thousands to get into the crypto game.

OVERVIEW OF WolfpackBOT

WolfpackBOT is a highly advanced cryptocurrency trading software that allows for the execution of trades at lightning speed using proprietary trading algorithms, proprietary “Werewolf” Trading Analysis configurations, or user customized settings based on personal trading style. WolfpackBOT also allows for simultaneous trading access to all compatible cryptocurrency exchanges that are available to the bot, and all trading pairs with the WerewolfBOT subscription package.
WolfpackBOT is introducing an industry first, a beautiful automated cryptocurrency trading console: The WolfBOX. This efficient and sleek piece of hardware will conveniently allow for the full utilization of a bot subscription without the need for a VPS or dedicated computer. The WolfBOX will also include a built-in secure Hardware Wallet and RFID card reader to optimize ease-of-use and functionality.
WolfpackBOT trading software is enabled with limit, market, and “Wolf Trade” orders on all trading candles, including one-minute candles, with the widest array of technical trading indicators available on the market. WolfpackBOT's proprietary “Wolf Trade” orders provide superior market sell orders with a bite! WolfpackBOT is the only trading bot to feature live price scanning on your positions and also handles partial fills with ease, meaning you don’t miss out on orders. WolfpackBOT is incredibly fast and can fulfill up to 10,000 trades per day depending on market conditions and subscription package.
WolfpackBOT allows simultaneous trading access to all cryptocurrency exchanges that are available to the bot, and all trading pairs through the WerewolfBOT subscription plan. Not only do inferior bots allow limited access to one exchange and one trading pair per bot, they also store your API keys remotely on servers which are potentially susceptible to hacks and pump and dump attacks. User security and API key protection holds a high priority within the WolfpackBOT framework which is why it is the only trading bot that gives users full control with local management of their API keys.
Masternode and Proof of Work X11 Blockchain
Wolfcoin Blockchain with X11 Proof of Work Mining and Masternode Reward Systems The Wolfcoin blockchain and network are both designed and engineered to ensure store of value, transactional speed and security, and fungibility. The main goal of the Wolfcoin blockchain is to facilitate fast and secure transactions with a governance that helps sustain the network for the benefit of all users. The Wolfcoin blockchain is a two-tier network comprised of a Proof of Work (PoW) consensus mechanism powered by miners and a Proof of Service (PoSe) system powered by masternodes.
The Wolfcoin blockchain is secured through Proof of Work (PoW) in which miners attempt to solve difficult problems with specialized computers. When a problem is solved, the miner receives the right to add a new block to the blockchain. If the problem was solved correctly, the miner is rewarded once the block is added.
The second tier, which is powered by masternodes, enables Wolfcoin to facilitate private and instant transactions with Private Send and Instant Send. Masternodes are also rewarded when miners discover new blocks.
The block reward is distributed with 80% going to the masternodes and 20% going to miners. The masternode system is referred to as Proof of Service (PoSe), since the masternodes provide crucial services that support the features of the network.
Masternodes also oversee the network and have the power to reject improperly formed blocks from miners. If a miner tried to take the entire block reward for themselves, the masternode network would orphan the block ensuring that it would not be added to the blockchain.
In short, miners power the first tier, which is the basic sending and receiving of funds and prevention of double spending. Masternodes power the second tier, which provide the added features that make Wolfcoin different from other cryptocurrencies. Masternodes do not mine, and mining computers cannot serve as masternodes.
Additionally, each masternode is “secured” by 10,000 WOLF. Those WOLF remain under the sole control of their owner at all times. The funds are not locked in any way; however, if enough of the funds are moved or spent to cause the user’s holdings to drop below 10,000 Wolfcoin, the associated masternode will go offline and stop receiving rewards.
By pre-ordering your WolfpackBOT subscription, you will also receive Wolfcoin as a reward that can be utilized in the following ways:
  • Redeemable for WolfpackBOT subscriptions
  • Redeemable for the WolfBOX Console
  • Redeemable for WolfpackBOT and Wolfcoin apparel and merchandise
  • Fungible utility that can be exchanged for like value on exchanges
When you hold at least 10,000 Wolfcoin in your Wolfcoin wallet connected to a static IP address, you will become a masternode, meaning you will have a chance to receive 80 percent of the block reward every sixty seconds.

THE FEATURES

WolfpackBOT Automated Trading Software:

After the crowdsale, Wolfcoin will be the exclusive method of payment for WolfpackBOT Automated Trading Software subscriptions.

Multiple Technical Analysis Indicators:

WolfpackBOT offers the widest array of multiple Technical Analysis indicators, oscillators, configurations and settings available in the world of Automated Cryptocurrency Trading Bots. WolfpackBOT provides Bollinger Bands, Double EMA, Elliot Wave, EMA, EMA Cross, Fibonacci Sequence, KAMA, MA Cross, MACD, RSI, SMA, Stochastic, Stochastic RSI, Triple EMA, and many more!

Shorting Features:

WolfpackBOT includes Cryptocurrency Shorting Features that allow users to short their positions and buy them back at the lower price to maximize their returns.

Copyrighted Crash Protection:

Crash Protection, one of WolfpackBOT's most advanced features, enables users the option to automatically scan and convert all positions to a stable coin at the sign of our proprietary Hidden Bear Divergence Indicator, and then buy back into base currency to resume trading at the sign of our proprietary Hidden Bull Divergence Indicator.

Language Translator:

WolfpackBOT has a built in Language Translator that instantly translates the entire BOT into Dutch, English, French, German, or Spanish.

All Trading Pairs on all available Exchanges:

WolfpackBOT allows our customers to simultaneously trade on multiple cryptocurrency exchanges, and with all the exchange’s trading pairs available for trading. The best part is that it’s all possible on one bot with one subscription to the WerewolfBOT package!

Coin Selector:

While other automated trading platforms only allow for a limited amount of coins per subscription, WolfpackBOT allows all trading pairs and all coins to be traded on all the available major exchanges with the WerewolfBOT subscription. WolfpackBOT's proprietary Coin Selector allows for users to choose whether to trade all cryptocurrencies or blacklist some, thus not trading them at all, as well as search for the highest volume, greatest performing, or a specific volatility range of coins for a given timeframe.

Werewolf Configurations and Settings:

Werewolf Configurations and Settings are copyrighted trading algorithms that use proprietary optimum settings for trading: the perfect configuration for experienced and inexperienced traders alike. These settings can be adjusted to the current market trend, with preset configurations for bear, sideways, and bull markets.

Werewolf Ultimate:

Werewolf Ultimate is the ultimate choice when trading. It doesn't trade a particular trading pair or particular coins, it trades them all. It goes in for the kill to increase the potential returns. Crash Protection is a built-in feature in Werewolf Ultimate.

Werewolf Bull Market:

Werewolf Bull Market are preset settings and configurations that are usable when your Base Trading Pair is in a Bull Run. Werewolf Bull Market settings are optimized for such conditions and should only be used in a Bull Run Market.

Werewolf Sideways Market:

Werewolf Sideways Market are preset settings and configurations that are usable when your Base Trading Pair is trading sideways. Werewolf Sideways Market settings are optimized for such conditions and should only be used in a Sideways Trading Market.

Werewolf Bear Market:

Werewolf Bear Market are preset settings and configurations that are usable when your Base Trading Pair is in a Bear Run. Werewolf Bear Market settings are optimized for such conditions and should only be used in a Bear Run Market.

The WolfBOX Hardware Console:

WolfpackBOT also offers an industry first: a beautiful hardware console, The WolfBOX. Our console comes preloaded with WolfpackBOT Automated Trading Software and also includes a built-in secure hardware wallet. Some of the key features of the WolfBOX include our high-speed CPU, solid-state hard drive, built-in RFID card reader, and integrated Bitpay and Coinbase wallets.

Wolfpack Consulting

Our company offers its services and expertise as Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Specialists to individuals and companies. We offer consulting services in the fields of blockchain and cryptocurrency development and management.

Wolfpack Philanthropy

We are dedicated to the proposition that we have a responsibility to use a portion of our company’s revenue to help create a better world and a brighter future. As we move forward, our philanthropic efforts include environmental stewardship, renewable energy, human rights, economic development, as well as animal and wildlife rescue and conservation with an emphasis on dogs and wolves.

Wolfcoin Information

THE WOLFCOIN Wolfcoin is the coin that fuels all WolfpackBOT's projects.
This utility, coupled with the reward systems with mining and Masternoding capabilities, makes the use of Wolfcoin potentially appealing to all WolfpackBOT users whom are interested in receiving additional Wolfcoin for subscriptions, merchandise and other rewards such as passive cryptocurrency portfolio growth.
THE WOLFCOIN WALLET WolfpackBOT uses our proprietary Wolfcoin Core QT wallet.
February 2018 Conceptual development of WolfpackBOT Software
May 2018 Company Roadmap development Alpha models of WolfpackBOT Software
June 2018 Ongoing research, development, and testing
October 2018 Advertising and Marketing Campaign Starts Wallets available for payment; BTC, BTG, DASH, DOGE, ETC, ETH, LTC October 15 - Pre-registration begins
November 2018 November 1 - Crowdsale Stage I begins
December 2018 Official presentation of WolfpackBOT beta Software Preview Creation of Wolfcoin (WOLF: 300,000,000 coins pre-mined on Genesis Block) WolfpackBOT beta Software release to selected customers
December 21 - Launch network and mine Genesis block
December 22 - PoW / Mainnet
December 23 - Blockchain and network testing
December 28 - Iquidis Wolfcoin Block Explorer released on our website
January 2019 January 1 - Wolfcoin Core wallets available for download on the website January 1 - Wallet and Masternode Tutorial available January 1 - Masternode and PoW instructional videos available January 1 - Subscription Pre-order Coin Rewards disbursed Announcement listing WOLF on top-10 Exchange
February 2019 February 1 - Crowdsale Stage I Ends February 1 - Crowdsale Stage II Begins
March 2019 March 15 - Crowdsale Stage II Ends March 15 - Crowdsale Stage III Begins WolfpackBOT Software roll-out to contributors WolfBOX Console available for Pre-order
April 2019 WolfpackBOT Subscriptions available for customers First Major version released: automated, manual, and paper trading WolfpackBOT Live support center April 30 - Crowdsale Stage III Ends
May 2019 WolfBOX Consoles Pre-orders first shipment
June 2019 New trading features such as new exchanges, strategy options and indicators
July 2019 New trading features such as new exchanges, strategy options or indicators
August 2019 WolfpackBOT Software Trading Platform V2.0 Second major release: Strategy Marketplace and Back-testing
September 2019 New trading features such as new exchanges, strategy options or indicators
October 2019 WolfpackBOT Software Trading Platform V3.0 Third major release: Signals Marketplace (Supporting 3rd Party App Signals) Mobile Application for WolfpackBOT Software and Trading Platform
November 2019 New trading features such as new exchanges, strategy options or indicator
December 2019 WolfpackBOT Software Trading Platform V4.0
January 2020 WolfpackBOT Software Trading Platform V5.0 Fourth major release: Machine Learning Strategy Optimization

THE AMAZING TEAM

Philip Longhurst Chief Executive Officer The leader of our pack and the man behind the WolfpackBOT trading bot, Philip Longhurst is a mathematical genius, engineer, day trader, and animal rescuer. As an account manager for J.P. Morgan and MBNA Bank, Phil managed the accounts of several high-profile clients and businesses. He has been successfully trading stocks for over twenty-five years and has successfully applied his trading expertise and mathematical acumen to the cryptocurrency market since 2013.
Philip holds bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering and business administration and is a loving husband, father, and family man who has been rescuing dogs since 1995. His driving desire is to use the success of Wolfpack Group to create a brighter future for humanity. He currently resides in the United States of America with his wife, daughter, and dogs.
Rogier Pointl Chief Financial Officer Rogier Pointl is a successful entrepreneur with nearly twenty-five years of experience in business management, marketing, financial administration, economics, and fintech. Rogier holds bachelor's degrees in Business Communications and Financial Administration. He is a pioneer in the field of virtual reality, having served as CEO and owner of Simworld, the first virtual reality racing center in Europe, where he oversaw the development of advanced simulator and virtual reality hardware and software.
Rogier is an experienced trader and has been trading stocks since 2007. He began applying his expertise to the cryptocurrency market in 2010, gaining experience as a Bitcoin miner along the way. Rogier is a loving husband and father and currently resides in the Netherlands with his wife and two daughters.
Jason Cormier Chief Technical Officer Jason Cormier is a humble -but extraordinary- individual who is blessed with a Mensa IQ of 151, he is continually driven by a desire for knowledge and self-growth. He is self-taught in Visual Basics, C#, C++, HTML, and CSS and began developing programs and applications at the age of 14, including the TCB Wallet, which was the first ever wallet program that held its users' log in names and passwords. Jason is a cryptocurrency guru whose expertise includes cryptocurrency mining farms, proof-of-stake, masternodes, and cryptocurrency trading.
Jason holds Associate degrees in Computer Science and Psychology, and currently resides in the United States of America with his wife and son.
Jay McKinney Chief Web Development and Design Officer Jay is a veteran of the Iraq War who put his life on the line in combat to protect our freedoms. To center himself while stationed in the Iraqi warzone, he taught himself C# as he knew honing his Web Development skills would help him provide a better future for himself and his family. Upon returning home safely, he worked his way through college and holds bachelor's degrees in Computer Programming and Web Development & Design.
Jay has worked for the Kentucky Housing Corporation, serving as a software engineer and web developer. He is a loving family man who currently resides in the United States of America with his wife and two children.
David Johnson Chief Software Development Officer David holds a Master of Science degree in Information Systems and a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration with a specialization in Information Systems, graduating with Magna Cum Laude status. He has worked for the Kentucky Housing Corporation, serving as a network analyst and software engineer. As an entrepreneur, he has owned his own web and software development company since 2009, creating and maintaining several websites in C# and PHP, and has been operating the crypto-oriented YouTube channel BigBits since 2017, where he discusses automated Cryptocurrency trading strategies.
David is a proud father of two and resides in the United States of America with his wife and children. Like any good Kentuckian, he is a huge fan of the University of Kentucky's college sports teams.
Gabriel Condrea Software and Web Development Officer Gabriel Condrea holds a bachelor's degree in electrical and computer engineering and has worked as a software developer and senior systems engineer in both the United States and the United Kingdom, working with a variety of programming languages and IDEs. He has used his expertise to create Manufacturing and SCADA systems in industrial applications.
Gabriel also applies his engineering skills to cryptocurrency day trading, seeking to automate the process. He loves to travel and currently resides in the United States with his girlfriend.
Igor Otorepec Chief Hardware Development Officer Igor is an engineer with twenty years of experience specializing in advanced PLC programming and industrial robotics. He is also an IT security expert and a CEC Certified Ethical Cracker who uses his skills to expose and patch security vulnerabilities in blockchain codes.
Igor is an advanced cryptocurrency trader and Kung Fu master who uses bio-hacking as a way of life to keep his 'chi' constantly centered. He currently resides in Austria with his loving wife.
Manik Ehhsan Director of Marketing and Public Relations Manik holds a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and has over five years of experience in Web Development, Digital Marketing and Graphics Design. He has also managed the marketing for more than 30 successful Cryptocurrency start-ups and projects, and specializes in SEO and ASO. Manik is also a Cryptocurrency project promotion expert with an emphasis on Masternodes and building Social Media Communities.
Manik has focused his life on Cryptocurrency and currently resides in Bangladesh with his loving family.
Rance Garrison Chief Marketing Officer Rance Garrison holds a bachelor's degree in Business Administration and specialized in Seminary Studies for his Master's degree. He served as an AmeriCorps VISTA at WMMT-FM, the radio station owned by Appalshop, an arts and education center in Kentucky, and has also specialized in local cable television advertising. Rance is also a musician who has released several albums independently over the last decade.
Rance is very dedicated to his local community and is most excited by the potential implications of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology for rural and remote economies. He currently resides in the United States of America with his wife, dog, and cats.
Paul Gabens Chief Public Relations Officer A master negotiator with a penchant for strategy, Paul Gabens brings more than twenty years of marketing and promotional experience in the automotive, hospitality, and entertainment industries to the Wolfpack. He is also an avid stock and cryptocurrency trader, having first entered into the cryptocurrency market two years ago, embracing his passion for crypto with the same vigor as his love for travel, classic cars, extreme roller coasters, and surfing.
Paul holds degrees in business management, marketing, and automotive aftermarket. He currently resides in the United States with his fiancé and two cats.
Blake Stanley Marketing and Social Media Officer Blake Stanley is a cryptocurrency enthusiast who also has over six years of experience managing both government and private sector client and customer relations. A strategic thinker and expert in the field of social media-based advertising, Blake also owns and manages his own online marketing company where he has been successfully curating and implementing online marketing and advertising strategies for his clients for the past three years.
Blake is a proud father and family man and currently lives in the United States with his daughter and fiancé.
Martin Kilgore Market and Trading Analyst Martin Kilgore holds bachelor’s degrees in both accounting and mathematics, having researched Knot Theory and the Jones Polynomial during his undergraduate studies, giving him a firm edge when analyzing market conditions. He has worked as a staff accountant for several governmental organizations.
Martin lives in the United States with his fiancé.
Jonathan McDonald Chief Trading Strategy Officer Jonathan has honed his trading skills over the past five years by studying and implementing economics, financial strategy, Forex trading analysis and trading bots. Through his constant learning, he discovered Cryptocurrency after seeing the difference in market volatility and high yield trading. His fine-tuned trading strategies complement Crypto markets perfectly, and he has been implementing trading strategies to the Cryptocurrency market for over a year with phenomenal results. Jonathan is constantly improving his trading skills with an emphasis on scalping techniques. He has applied his trading skillset to the WolfpackBOT and enjoys working alongside the Wolfpack in creating the fastest trading bot on the market.
Jonathan currently resides in Canada with his supportive girlfriend and family.
Web site: https://www.wolfpackbot.com/
Technical document: https://www.wolfpackbot.com/Pdf/whitepaper_en.pdf
Bounty0x username: idrixoxo
submitted by idrixoxo2015 to u/idrixoxo2015 [link] [comments]

A financial expert's very negative outlook on Bitcoin.

Hello there people of reddit!
I have translated this blog post which I would like to share with you all. The original blog post appeared in a rather famous hungarian financial blog and it posed some interesting questions. It would be really good if the intelligent people of reddit would start a debate on these topics. There is a big learning opportunity here. I personally disagree with many of the points made in the post while I agree with some of them.
I think that it is important to listen to the negative opinions because we can grow from them and we can either strengthen our opinions by disproving the counter-arguments of others or we can formulate and fine-tune our opinions by accepting partial truths from the opposing opinion. (Maybe we can even change our opinions alltogether in some cases) I post this in the hopes of having an intelligent conversation about the topic and it would be a bit sad if this would get downvoted because then the conversation wouldn’t be able to unfold.
I say let's examine the other side, let's look at their arguments, let's try to understand them and let’s try to learn from them so that we may become smarter, better, and more well informed.
Also this can be a very good test if you think about investing in Bitcoin. If this discourages you then your fundamental knowledge of cryptocurrencies or Bitcoin may not be satisfactory yet or you may be thinking about investing with money what you cannot afford to loose
So without further to do here is the actual blog post translated from kiszamolo.hu.
RTT314
I am writing about Bitcoin. I didn’t want to at all but since everybody is talking about it I had to.
Translator's note: There was a previous blog post about Bitcoin which got a massive amount of feedback in the hungarian community.
The general feedback I received about my previous post on Bitcoin wonderfully resembled the the feedback I got when I wrote about Kairos, Emgoldex, Quaestor and Sitetalk. (these were all scams in their times)
In case you don’t have time to read the comments on my previous post I’ll summarize them for you. Its quite simple because people basically write the same thing all over again (Bitcoin or Emgoldex it doesn’t matter.) The comment categories are as follows:
It’s a good idea to look at those people who wrote these comments a few years back. The people of Kairos who came here (to his blog) taunting and showing off their earnings with Kairos. And then all of a sudden it became apparent that it was just another scam and they lost all the money in a heartbeat.
What did I cover in the previous blog post on Bitcoin?
I wrote, that you don’t know anything about Bitcoin, that you don’t know who is behind it or whether there is someone behind it or not. What gives actually Bitcoin’s value? How do we know that its better than the other cryptocurrencies? How do we know if one BTC is expensive for 1000 dollars or cheap? For a long time people bought it for 1 dollar, then for a long time for 100, then 1000 and now 16 thousand. Which price is the realistic one? Or none of it is realistic and its still cheap? How can I find it out?
I have basically nothing at all to which I could compare its price. Just like in the dotcom bubble when it came to evaluating the .com companies. The normal method of evaluation didn’t work when it came to these companies because everybody wanted to think, that these companies can conquer the whole world. And because of that basically no price was too expensive for a share. And then it became apparent, that in fact even a single dollar was too much for 95% of them.
Just because something is revolutionary and new it doesn’t mean that it has value too. Especially when anybody can copy it freely. This happened with the .com companies too. Everybody learned fast, that just because they are innovative and revolutionary they can’t make a profit and most of them didn’t even worth a penny.
And the .com companies were 100 times easier to evaluate than Bitcoin. At least they had expenses, profits, employees, products and patents. You could at least calculate with something.
Why is Bitcoin considered money? Currently it has none of the properties of money - you can’t pay with it everywhere, it’s exchange rate is not stable at all and because of that it is not suitable for accumulating wealth in it (just in the past 12 hours the price of one BTC was between $16.123 and $17.023 and today is one of the calmer days.)
Anybody can invent a newer Bitcoin and people do so too. There’s almost ten times more cryptocurrencies today than normal currencies in the world and almost every day a new one gets listed. This is because anybody can make a cryptocurrency. You don’t have to have a whole country behind it with its total assets, government, and financial traffic. If you have good marketing you will be a millionaire from a new cryptocurrency. Currently there are 1324 cryptocurrencies and there is almost no day when no new ones are added. On the contrary there is only 180 types of traditional currencies in the world.
I also mentioned, that governments can limit the use of cryptocurrencies any time by illegalizing the exchange of cryptocurrencies to real money. And if that happens all cryptocurrencies will be worthless in a blink of an eye.
I don’t want to get into new ideological debates. I just want to place Bitcoin amongst all the hype into the world’s financial traffic. Where does Bitcoin stand compared to the current world’s financial traffic and does it look like a bubble? Will it really change the world’s financial system and will it really change the old technologies?
Bitcoin’s total market cap was 15,49 billion dollars on 2017 January the 1st and what’s at least as important is that the daily traffic volume was 92 million dollars.
https://imgur.com/a/kI0Ru
Bitcoin’s current market cap (17 thousand dollars) is 289 billion dollars and the daily traffic volume is 12.135 million dollars so the daily traffic grew 131-fold since January the 1st.
One of the world’s biggest bank - the Bank of America’s - market cap is also 300 billion dollars and that is accompanied by 2,228 billion dollars worth of assets which gives one of the basis of the actual evaluation. Bitcoin has zero assets. Bank of America every four months (!!!) profits 22,3 billion dollars and one fifth of this is net profit. The profit of Bitcoin is zero and the net profit of Bitcoin is also zero.
Europe’s 16th biggest economy, Finland has a yearly GDP of 236 billion dollars.
If Bitcoin’s market cap doubles again, it’s market cap will be equal to Hungary’s, Ukraine’s, Slovakia’s, Luxemburg’s, Croatia’s, Bulgaria’s and Latvia’s GDP all together. Or at least on paper. (Of course the actual BTC's market cap and the GDP is very different, but i guess you can still feel the nonsense in this)
People make 337 thousand daily transactions with Bitcoin.
Just Visa alone makes 468 million transactions per day and this is just a tiny slice from the total world’s transactions.
The SWIFT system which is used by banks to make international transfers even 12 years ago made 5 thousand billion dollars worth of traffic. Daily.(!) The similiar Fedwire payment system which works in the USA had a daily traffic of 2,1 thousand billion dollars, the CHIPS had 1,4 thousand billion dollars. And these numbers are 12 years old so you can easily double them to get to the present numbers. And this data is only of three clearing houses out of a dozen! All the national clearing houses in total can have multiple hundred times more traffic than these ones.
Even if we would like to use Bitcoin for just one tenth of the traffic of Visa we would soon have to store a few gigabytes then terabytes of data for each Bitcoin. The whole electricity generation and bandwidth of the world wouldn’t be enough if we would want to manage and transmit this much data constantly. (Even now the Bitcoin network uses more power than Bulgaria. The investors who mine Bitcoin spend money mostly on video cards and electricity. The biggest benefitors of Bitcoin are the chinese electricity providers and the video card companies. Even a whole bank system doesn’t use this much electricity and they execute multiple hundred thousand times more transactions than the Bitcoin’s network.)
The technology is unsuitable for microtransactions. There are cryptocurrencies which are suitable for this but what will happen with you investment in Bitcoin when everybody starts to use one of these currencies?
The future of the blockchain technology is completely different from the future price of Bitcoin which currently is just one out of 1324 cryptocurrencies and for which you paid a bunch of money. Somehow the people who kick back and leave their future on the price of Bitcoin don’t want to understand this.
Just so you understand: I don’t argue whether or not blockchain technology (which is used by Bitcoin too) will be used in the future financial system. I argue whether or not one Bitcoin values 17 thousand dollars or even one dollar as a matter of fact.
Do you think there will be a single bank which will choose exactly Bitcoin when it wants to switch to this new technology when Bitcoin is a completely unsuitable candidate? Or do you think that the bank will choose another cryptocurrency? Won’t the bank simply make its own one?
The total value of all the dollar bills in circulation is 1,59 trillion dollars or 1590 billion dollars. If we look at the M3 (unbounded money in bank accounts, bills etc.) instead of only the bills we get 11 trillion dollars. But even this is only a tiny bit compared to the total assets in the american economy which is 220 trillion dollars.
The daily size of the forex market is (!) 5.100.000.000.000 dollars.
So think again when you see numbers which suggest that Bitcoin is the future. I wrote these numbers just so you can get a sense of the big Bitcoin which is about to knock down the world’s banking system. Just so you can understand the big Bitcoin’s place in the financial food chain.
I’d also like to talk about a common misconception. Many people think that the value of Bitcoin comes from the fact that it’s very expensive to maintain. The mining is expensive. This is called an expense and it has no relation to value whatsoever. Things don’t represent value because they are costly to maintain. This is exactly the opposite of value. The more expensive is something to maintain the less valuable it is. Companies which have small costs value more than companies which have big costs with the same profits.
There’s an old trick in the stocks market called pooling. A few scammers organize into a pool, they choose a smaller stock and they start to trade amongst each other with higher and higher prices. They just have to be careful not to catch attention. They have to increase the price gradually and slowly and the pool has to be big enough in order to stay undetected.
When the whole world goes crazy because of the huge gains on the pooled stock and when everybody wants to be a part of the miracle the pool quietly sell the whole stack of stocks and disappear.
The “investors” which are driven by greed don’t even care about the fact that the evaluation of the stock flied far above the actual value of the stock. How much simpler is this whole move when the given thing doesn’t even have a quantifiable value to which you can compare it to? Bitcoin is exactly like this.
I wonder how are Bitcoins divided amongst the wallets? Could you drive up its value by getting into pools? You can’t drive up its value because it doesn’t even have any inherent value. The value of Bitcoin only comes from the people who are willing to pay for it. Bitcoin only has a price because people want to look at it as money even if it cannot function as money.
The american dollar will have value until the United States exists and its government collects taxes in dollars from the world’s biggest economy and it pays its payouts in dollars. And if someone doesn’t want to pay the requested taxes in dollars the government has the power to imprison the person.
The expression of total financial ignorance is when the believers of Bitcoin state that the real currencies are also based on nothing. The real currencies are just paper too without any value. Every real currency is backed by real value: the given country’s economy, assets, government, tax system give real value to the real currency. No cryptocurrency can present anything like this ever because cryptocurrencies are made out of thin air.
Real currencies can function exactly because of this: because they have value too not just a price. This is why they can be a store of value, this is why they can be accepted in trade. Because tomorrow they will be worth just as much as today. They’re not just empty ping pong balls which are moved based on the needs and wants of the buyer. Potentially 10-20% per day.
(Just for the sake of the smartpants: of course after world wars a real currency can lose value too just like how the syrian fiat lost value too when the value was essentially bombed out of it. The country’s economy collapsed and half of the taxpayers died or fled out of the country. But even this shows exactly the fact, that the price of the currency changes if the inherent value changes. And also the the price of the safety fiats (swiss franc) can be pumped up if investors are panicking. But we only know that their price is high compared to what their value is because it has a value.)
Just because I invent the Reddit coin and create a lot but finite real physical coins it won’t be a currency which has value. Not even if the coins are unfalsifiable. Not even if there will be people who are willing to pay real money for my coins. Not even if other people realize that they can make coins just like me any time (that’s why there are already 1324 types of cryptocurrencies on the market) It won’t be real money even if following the current trend I create this Reddit coin as a cryptocurrency. Money doesn’t become money because I say its money. Neither does it become money because other people believe its money.
But let's take a look at the bitcoin wallets amongst the investors:
https://imgur.com/a/WN163
So basically 97,2% of the wallets doesn’t even own a single bitcoin! And 55,5% of the wallets doesn’t even contain 0,001 bitcoin!
Of course a wallet is not necessarily a person but its apparent that there are many small fish in the sea of Bitcoin. It's good to know this when you read all the comments from the people who try to defend Bitcoin no matter what. Most of them don’t even own 700 bucks worth of bitcoin but they will become rich for life from this investment.
0,01% of the investors - 1.677 people own nearly 40% of the total bitcoins available. (Or it may be that these 1.677 wallets are owned by one person or twenty. We can’t even know that) but even 85% of the total bitcoins is in less than 1% of the wallets. In stocks lingo this is called a low free float.
These people are the ones who manipulate the prices however they want it to. But of course they don’t want it to because why would they want such a thing? The prices are rising just because Bitcoin is the future.
If Bitcoin wouldn’t be the Holy Bitcoin it would be simply called a Ponzi scheme. How does a Ponzi scheme look exactly? They build up a system which is new, which is alluring and about which people can believe that it’s the future. From this you’ll become rich. If you pay enough money now then you’ll be the part of the money rain too. Until more people are buying in than out the Ponzi scheme works great. Nobody realizes that there’s nothing behind it. Just the money of the depositors gives it value.
Bitcoin is genial because it never even stated that there is some sort of value behind it so you can’t even expect it in the first place. Until more people want to put money in than out the price of Bitcoin will rise. I’ll say this again Bitcoin is alive because people want to treat it as money. “This is the money of the future, you are lagging behind if you don’t understand this. Why do you try to find the inherent value of it and the evaluation of it? You are an old prick who has no clue. This is a new world. Deal with it. You have to just believe this and don’t ask any questions.” Do you know how many times have I heard this from the faithful “investors” of the kairos, sidetalk, emgoldex ponzi schemes?
A lot of people wait a lot from the december 18th stock appearance of Bitcoin but it can bring more bad than good. If the big speculators start to go hard on it they can double the price or drag it down to 0 within days. It's rather easy for them because there is no value behind it. Just a price tag. If the British Pound was attacked what do you think what will they do with Bitcoin? Here there is no national bank which will change the interest rates or pull other tricks from its sleeves to defend its own currency from falling or from a rising. Also here the investors won’t be able to say that a bitcoin is definitely worth more than this or not because the whole english economy is not behind it so they don’t have a guide for its inherent value. If Bitcoin was volatile so far you can prepare yourself for even bigger storms.
You think whatever you want and you pay money for whatever you want. You know what? Even I’m telling you that knowing the madness, dumbness, and greed of people it is not unimaginable that Bitcoin will rise to 150 thousand dollars within the next year. But not because its value is that much but because there are too many greedy people who feel like they were left out of a great opportunity but it's not too late to jump in.
But also don’t be amazed if its price will be 1 dollar again.
submitted by RTT314 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-09-23 to 2018-12-09 01:20 PDT

Period: 76.83 days
Submissions Comments
Total 982 5230
Rate (per day) 12.78 67.37
Unique Redditors 702 946
Combined Score 5730 16211

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 366 points, 45 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (68 points, 12 comments)
    2. Do powerful unions increase wages above the optimal level, or do firms with market power cause imperfect competition in the labor market, causing sub optimal wages? (Or both?) (29 points, 2 comments)
    3. How do the salaries of high paid professionals compare between the US and various other developed countries? (28 points, 1 comment)
    4. Just how much more expensive is it to build on mountainous terrain than on flat land? How much more expensive would housing have to be before it's economical to develop the mountains of Hong Kong? (27 points, 5 comments)
    5. When it is said that someone in a third world country lives on a dollar a day, what does that actually mean? (25 points, 19 comments)
    6. How do economists measure unpaid work? (23 points, 8 comments)
    7. What's the economic effect of legal vs illegal immigration? (22 points, 10 comments)
    8. If someone saved enough money to live on investment income, could their descendants live off it indefinitely? (Assuming they don't spend the principle, reinvest to account for inflation, etc, of course.) (20 points, 46 comments)
    9. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (11 points, 7 comments)
    10. What are some common misconceptions about economics? (11 points, 19 comments)
  2. 134 points, 11 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (42 points, 20 comments)
    2. What caused the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis? (31 points, 13 comments)
    3. Would it be more economical for supermarkets to slightly under-stock? (21 points, 12 comments)
    4. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (20 points, 8 comments)
    5. What might cause sudden inflation? (7 points, 2 comments)
    6. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (7 points, 3 comments)
    7. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (4 points, 8 comments)
    8. Is Ordoliberalism feasible for most poor and recently war-torn countries? (1 point, 0 comments)
    9. Why do some businesses sponsor sporting teams in countries they don't operate in, and that they don't plan to expand to in the foreseeable future? (1 point, 1 comment)
    10. Is it inevitable that certain areas will never recover from a war? If so, why? (0 points, 0 comments)
  3. 96 points, 5 submissions: MrZer
    1. Why do countries like France or Japan have a high debt to GDP but aren't in shambles like Greece? (43 points, 16 comments)
    2. Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians? (22 points, 18 comments)
    3. I've heard Marxists claim that central planning is good because the military and corporations do it. (20 points, 38 comments)
    4. Someone once said "Interest is what actually creates money. Without debt and interest, our economies would collapse." (7 points, 5 comments)
    5. What does it mean when people say China manipulates currency? (4 points, 7 comments)
  4. 83 points, 17 submissions: Whynvme
    1. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (19 points, 5 comments)
    2. If we have cobb douglas preferences, my demand for x is not a function of the price of y. How do substitution effects arise then? (13 points, 6 comments)
    3. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    4. some basic macro questions (6 points, 5 comments)
    5. understanding equilibrium in a dynamic context? (6 points, 1 comment)
    6. Trying to understand economies of scale, e.g. costco (5 points, 5 comments)
    7. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (5 points, 3 comments)
    8. question about equilibrium tax incidence (3 points, 1 comment)
    9. trying to understand the utility of theoretical models (3 points, 3 comments)
    10. when firms are earning short run economic profit, does that just mean all factors of production are earning more than their opportunity cost? so firms entering the industry = labor and capital reallocating towards that industry by forming new firms? (3 points, 1 comment)
  5. 65 points, 1 submission: imadeadinside
    1. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises (65 points, 16 comments)
  6. 57 points, 2 submissions: csObsession
    1. Do most economists think political and economic freedoms are intrinsically tied together? How do they explain the success of extremely authoritarian capitalist governments (Singapore, China, South Korea, Chile)? (37 points, 25 comments)
    2. Why are salaries for professionals so much higher in the United States than other developed countries? (20 points, 34 comments)
  7. 53 points, 13 submissions: Experimentalphone
    1. Why do Information Technology workers are so high in demand and earn so much in Western countries but doesn't even get sustenance wage in Bangladesh? (30 points, 10 comments)
    2. Anyone know of a comprehensive list of all the sub disciplines one can do a PhD in Economics, Finance and Business? (6 points, 4 comments)
    3. Which PhD sub disciplines have the least math but still good employability prospects in academia and industry? (5 points, 19 comments)
    4. What is the best website to publish your working papers in Economics? (3 points, 4 comments)
    5. Do I have to prove factual assertions before providing my arguments on economic policy suggestions for a journal article? (2 points, 4 comments)
    6. Why is the Ready Made Garments industry of Bangladesh declining due to withdrawal of trade privileges of Western countries when prices are already competitive in the world market? (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. Are qualitative policy prescription papers accepted by most journals or are they better of in blog posts? (1 point, 7 comments)
    8. What is the best free website for working papers in Economics? (1 point, 3 comments)
    9. Where can I find data on work conditions and how hard is the work of foreign students who work alongside their studies legally or illegally? (1 point, 0 comments)
    10. Which metrics do I need, to find out the effects of outward remittance on a poor economy? (1 point, 5 comments)
  8. 52 points, 6 submissions: FrankVillain
    1. Is China still considered a centrally planned economy? (16 points, 4 comments)
    2. Ressources on the Soviet industrial failures due to poor economics? (15 points, 2 comments)
    3. What is the reason behind France's high unemployment rate? (10 points, 13 comments)
    4. About Land Value Tax & Single Tax: how would it affect farmers and those of them who own their land? (9 points, 3 comments)
    5. Does welfare policies contribute to inflation? (2 points, 1 comment)
    6. If a Bitcoin is worth $1 000 000 and some persons like Satoshi have one or more millions of it... what power do they have? Can they disrupt the financial system with the huge amount of dollars that they have? (0 points, 8 comments)
  9. 49 points, 9 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Can someone explain M0 , M1 and M2 to me? (13 points, 2 comments)
    2. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (13 points, 8 comments)
    3. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    5. Why aren't all banks Full Reserve Banking? (5 points, 3 comments)
    6. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (3 points, 4 comments)
    7. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
    8. Is investing in Forex worth it? (0 points, 15 comments)
    9. What is Fractional Reserve Banking? (0 points, 4 comments)
  10. 47 points, 1 submission: furikakebabe
    1. The Tax Bill of 2017 reduced corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. Tax haven countries have rates as low as 15%. Why would companies be more likely to move money back to the US if they still aren’t getting a better rate? (47 points, 6 comments)
  11. 47 points, 1 submission: gh0bs
    1. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? (47 points, 32 comments)
  12. 45 points, 1 submission: wcoleman22
    1. For all the economists out there that got advanced degrees, what were your most influential assigned readings? (45 points, 23 comments)
  13. 43 points, 1 submission: Crane_Train
    1. How could Venezuela fix its economy? (43 points, 17 comments)
  14. 42 points, 4 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (12 points, 69 comments)
    3. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (6 points, 16 comments)
    4. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (4 points, 3 comments)
  15. 42 points, 1 submission: kornork
    1. With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now? (42 points, 3 comments)
  16. 41 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (41 points, 2 comments)
  17. 39 points, 1 submission: infernomedia
    1. What are some of the most interesting results in economics that are widely well regarded by the academic community to come out in the last decade? (39 points, 7 comments)
  18. 38 points, 1 submission: -reasonable-person-
    1. From an Economic Perspective What is the Most Effective Way for Mexico to end its Violent Organized Crime Problem? (38 points, 13 comments)
  19. 38 points, 1 submission: ajsox22
    1. Does culture impact the growth and development of a nation's economy? (38 points, 15 comments)
  20. 37 points, 8 submissions: MedStudent-96
    1. Quasi-convexity of the Indirect Utility Function? (12 points, 14 comments)
    2. Is my textbook wrong? (9 points, 8 comments)
    3. Interpretation of Lagrange Multipliers for Consumer (5 points, 4 comments)
    4. Consumer Demand Interpretation for Cobb Douglas-Non Convex to Origin. (4 points, 6 comments)
    5. Do monopolies produce the same as a competitive firm in the long run? (4 points, 8 comments)
    6. In some circumstances can a monopoly leave the consumer better off? (1 point, 3 comments)
    7. Two Period Consumption Savings Model (1 point, 3 comments)
    8. [General Equilibrium] Proving that in the limit case the core shrinks to the set of competitive equilibrium. (1 point, 0 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. BainCapitalist (2255 points, 571 comments)
  2. smalleconomist (1053 points, 307 comments)
  3. RobThorpe (853 points, 247 comments)
  4. Calvo_fairy (721 points, 146 comments)
  5. Cross_Keynesian (527 points, 126 comments)
  6. zzzzz94 (468 points, 83 comments)
  7. raptorman556 (334 points, 91 comments)
  8. Integralds (323 points, 51 comments)
  9. whyrat (298 points, 56 comments)
  10. MrDannyOcean (290 points, 48 comments)
  11. isntanywhere (263 points, 84 comments)
  12. benjaminikuta (249 points, 133 comments)
  13. penguin_rider222 (158 points, 40 comments)
  14. daokedao4 (148 points, 23 comments)
  15. lawrencekhoo (132 points, 13 comments)
  16. ecolonomist (129 points, 45 comments)
  17. RegulatoryCapture (126 points, 29 comments)
  18. intowilde (114 points, 28 comments)
  19. VineFynn (113 points, 30 comments)
  20. MedStudent-96 (103 points, 48 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (68 points, 12 comments)
  2. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises by imadeadinside (65 points, 16 comments)
  3. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? by gh0bs (47 points, 32 comments)
  4. The Tax Bill of 2017 reduced corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. Tax haven countries have rates as low as 15%. Why would companies be more likely to move money back to the US if they still aren’t getting a better rate? by furikakebabe (47 points, 6 comments)
  5. For all the economists out there that got advanced degrees, what were your most influential assigned readings? by wcoleman22 (45 points, 23 comments)
  6. How could Venezuela fix its economy? by Crane_Train (43 points, 17 comments)
  7. Why do countries like France or Japan have a high debt to GDP but aren't in shambles like Greece? by MrZer (43 points, 16 comments)
  8. Is free public transport a good idea? by Fart_Gas (42 points, 20 comments)
  9. With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now? by kornork (42 points, 3 comments)
  10. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? by TheHoleInMoi (41 points, 2 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 68 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  2. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  3. 54 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
  4. 52 points: Qwernakus's comment in What is the difference between GDP (Nominal), GDP (PPP), and Real GDP ?
  5. 50 points: TheoryOfSomething's comment in Which parts of Marxism are theoretically dependent on the labor theory of value and which are not?
  6. 47 points: Lucid-Crow's comment in I've heard Marxists claim that central planning is good because the military and corporations do it.
  7. 46 points: Integralds's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  8. 44 points: Yankee9204's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
  9. 43 points: lawrencekhoo's comment in With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now?
  10. 42 points: Cross_Keynesian's comment in Does income inequality really matter?
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Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-08-22 to 2018-11-12 07:20 PDT

Period: 82.02 days
Submissions Comments
Total 979 6319
Rate (per day) 11.94 76.69
Unique Redditors 688 1060
Combined Score 5907 19076

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 322 points, 37 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (71 points, 12 comments)
    2. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? (64 points, 24 comments)
    3. Do powerful unions increase wages above the optimal level, or do firms with market power cause imperfect competition in the labor market, causing sub optimal wages? (Or both?) (27 points, 3 comments)
    4. How do economists measure unpaid work? (24 points, 8 comments)
    5. When it is said that someone in a third world country lives on a dollar a day, what does that actually mean? (22 points, 19 comments)
    6. What are some common misconceptions about economics? (14 points, 19 comments)
    7. What would be a better alternative to Bernie's proposal to tax employers of welfare recipients? (14 points, 65 comments)
    8. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (10 points, 7 comments)
    9. To what degree has the internet increased the liquidity of the labor market? (7 points, 3 comments)
    10. What happened with the Greek economic crisis? (7 points, 5 comments)
  2. 146 points, 30 submissions: Whynvme
    1. When economists refer to industrialization, does it mean a move from agricultural to manufacturing economy? Is the growth in services a different term? (22 points, 6 comments)
    2. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (20 points, 5 comments)
    3. If we have cobb douglas preferences, my demand for x is not a function of the price of y. How do substitution effects arise then? (11 points, 6 comments)
    4. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    5. why is ceteris paribus important for analyzing/thinking about the world? (11 points, 7 comments)
    6. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (6 points, 3 comments)
    7. some basic macro questions (6 points, 2 comments)
    8. what is meant by value added? (6 points, 3 comments)
    9. Trying to understand economies of scale, e.g. costco (5 points, 5 comments)
    10. Why would an economy implode long term if there are decreasing returns to scale? (5 points, 15 comments)
  3. 95 points, 2 submissions: MrDannyOcean
    1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics (75 points, 135 comments)
    2. The new rules for AskEconomics are now in place. Please see the details within. (20 points, 20 comments)
  4. 79 points, 7 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (41 points, 20 comments)
    2. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (17 points, 8 comments)
    3. What might cause sudden inflation? (8 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (8 points, 3 comments)
    5. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (3 points, 8 comments)
    6. Do boycotts really work? (1 point, 3 comments)
    7. Why do some businesses sponsor sporting teams in countries they don't operate in, and that they don't plan to expand to in the foreseeable future? (1 point, 1 comment)
  5. 66 points, 7 submissions: FrankVillain
    1. Can the Euro become the global currency for trade? (17 points, 3 comments)
    2. Is China still considered a centrally planned economy? (16 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ressources on the Soviet industrial failures due to poor economics? (14 points, 2 comments)
    4. What is the reason behind France's high unemployment rate? (9 points, 14 comments)
    5. About Land Value Tax & Single Tax: how would it affect farmers and those of them who own their land? (7 points, 3 comments)
    6. Does welfare policies contribute to inflation? (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. If a Bitcoin is worth $1 000 000 and some persons like Satoshi have one or more millions of it... what power do they have? Can they disrupt the financial system with the huge amount of dollars that they have? (1 point, 8 comments)
  6. 66 points, 1 submission: imadeadinside
    1. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises (66 points, 16 comments)
  7. 64 points, 6 submissions: Serpenthrope
    1. Have there been any serious proposals for economic systems that don't use money? (23 points, 67 comments)
    2. Could a company ever become quality-control for a market in which they're competing, assuming no government interference? (16 points, 4 comments)
    3. Is there a formal name for this? (15 points, 6 comments)
    4. Why are second-hand clothing donations fundamentally different from other types of imports? (5 points, 1 comment)
    5. I saw this article on a UN report calling for the dismantling of Capitalism to stop Global Warming, and was wondering what most economists think of the claims? (3 points, 4 comments)
    6. Peter Navarro and Lyndon Larouche? (2 points, 1 comment)
  8. 62 points, 2 submissions: JeffGotSwags
    1. What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background? (36 points, 38 comments)
    2. How did the financial crisis affect the demand for economists? (26 points, 5 comments)
  9. 61 points, 11 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Can someone explain M0 , M1 and M2 to me? (13 points, 2 comments)
    2. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (11 points, 3 comments)
    3. Can a monopoly also be a monopsony? (10 points, 13 comments)
    4. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (10 points, 8 comments)
    5. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    6. Why aren't all banks Full Reserve Banking? (5 points, 3 comments)
    7. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (4 points, 4 comments)
    8. How would an universal free market deal with situations like NK? (3 points, 21 comments)
    9. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is investing in Forex worth it? (0 points, 15 comments)
  10. 60 points, 6 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (14 points, 68 comments)
    3. Tax Cuts boost Consumption, but the growth is short term while investments are long term. Why? (12 points, 7 comments)
    4. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (6 points, 3 comments)
    5. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (5 points, 16 comments)
    6. What even is Austerity? (3 points, 3 comments)
  11. 49 points, 1 submission: Akehc99
    1. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? (49 points, 27 comments)
  12. 48 points, 1 submission: Traveledfarwestward
    1. What do most Economists think about The Economist? (48 points, 26 comments)
  13. 48 points, 1 submission: piltonpfizerwallace
    1. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? (48 points, 31 comments)
  14. 47 points, 6 submissions: lalze123
    1. Will Bernie's "STOP BEZOS" plan lower the opportunity cost of hiring non-poor workers, thereby harming poor workers? (19 points, 15 comments)
    2. What does the current economic literature say about the effects of net neutrality? (14 points, 0 comments)
    3. What government programs have been empirically proven to help displaced workers from import competition? (8 points, 0 comments)
    4. By how much does lowering the budget deficit lower the trade deficit? (5 points, 4 comments)
    5. What are some good studies analyzing the difference in efficiency between markets and central planning? (1 point, 1 comment)
    6. Is the study below reliable? (0 points, 3 comments)
  15. 45 points, 1 submission: gh0bs
    1. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? (45 points, 32 comments)
  16. 42 points, 1 submission: Turnt_Up_For_What
    1. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? (42 points, 24 comments)
  17. 41 points, 1 submission: Crane_Train
    1. How could Venezuela fix its economy? (41 points, 19 comments)
  18. 41 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (41 points, 2 comments)
  19. 39 points, 5 submissions: UyhAEqbnp
    1. Does income inequality really matter? (19 points, 39 comments)
    2. What happens when there's a surplus of labour? Can there ever be a point where the wages earned are less than the cost of living? (10 points, 2 comments)
    3. Several questions (4 points, 4 comments)
    4. "Keeping seniors from retiring does not boost wages via aggregate demand" (3 points, 5 comments)
    5. Is Okun's Law valid? (3 points, 3 comments)
  20. 39 points, 4 submissions: justinVOLuntary
    1. Best resource on the financial crisis of 2008 (17 points, 7 comments)
    2. Blogs? (11 points, 5 comments)
    3. Econ Internship (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. Not sure if this is the kind of question I should be asking here. I’m an Undergrad Econ major and I’m looking for reading recommendations. Anything from economic theory, history, current research, etc. Main interest is Macro. Thanks (4 points, 5 comments)
  21. 39 points, 2 submissions: ConditionalDew
    1. How much would the iPhone be if it was made in the US? (37 points, 15 comments)
    2. Who are some famous people/celebrities that were economics majors? (2 points, 2 comments)
  22. 39 points, 1 submission: rangerlinks
    1. Who are the best economist to follow on Twitter? (39 points, 16 comments)
  23. 36 points, 5 submissions: CanadianAsshole1
    1. If free trade is so good, then why do countries insist on making trade deals? Why can't we just abolish all tariffs? (18 points, 11 comments)
    2. If climate change is such a huge problem, then why aren't countries utilizing nuclear energy more? (8 points, 17 comments)
    3. Do I understand the problem with"trickle-down" economics correctly? (6 points, 38 comments)
    4. How much of the Reagan administration's deficits could be attributed to increased defense spending? (3 points, 3 comments)
    5. If automation will result in less jobs, then shouldn't the government stop incentivizing childbirth through tax credits and stop immigration? (1 point, 12 comments)
  24. 35 points, 7 submissions: MedStudent-96
    1. Is my textbook wrong? (11 points, 8 comments)
    2. Quasi-convexity of the Indirect Utility Function? (9 points, 14 comments)
    3. Consumer Demand Interpretation for Cobb Douglas-Non Convex to Origin. (4 points, 6 comments)
    4. Do monopolies produce the same as a competitive firm in the long run? (4 points, 8 comments)
    5. Interpretation of Lagrange Multipliers for Consumer (4 points, 4 comments)
    6. Optimisation when MRTS > price ratio (2 points, 7 comments)
    7. Help with the Partial Derivative of the Marginal Cost Function. (1 point, 10 comments)
  25. 35 points, 1 submission: grate1438
    1. Why do Croatians receieve so much more through their pension than their working wage? (35 points, 8 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. BainCapitalist (2626 points, 648 comments)
  2. Calvo_fairy (947 points, 232 comments)
  3. smalleconomist (885 points, 255 comments)
  4. RobThorpe (776 points, 259 comments)
  5. zzzzz94 (577 points, 111 comments)
  6. Cross_Keynesian (520 points, 108 comments)
  7. Integralds (418 points, 68 comments)
  8. penguin_rider222 (395 points, 116 comments)
  9. whyrat (362 points, 69 comments)
  10. bbqroast (319 points, 74 comments)
  11. MrDannyOcean (314 points, 54 comments)
  12. isntanywhere (207 points, 63 comments)
  13. RedditUser91805 (189 points, 28 comments)
  14. CapitalismAndFreedom (176 points, 68 comments)
  15. benjaminikuta (171 points, 112 comments)
  16. LucasCritique (162 points, 33 comments)
  17. raptorman556 (157 points, 44 comments)
  18. lawrencekhoo (156 points, 22 comments)
  19. daokedao4 (131 points, 16 comments)
  20. Yankee9204 (121 points, 15 comments)
  21. roboczar (112 points, 20 comments)
  22. RegulatoryCapture (109 points, 23 comments)
  23. ecolonomist (105 points, 45 comments)
  24. TheoryOfSomething (102 points, 9 comments)
  25. Forgot_the_Jacobian (97 points, 31 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics by MrDannyOcean (75 points, 135 comments)
  2. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (71 points, 12 comments)
  3. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises by imadeadinside (66 points, 16 comments)
  4. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? by benjaminikuta (64 points, 24 comments)
  5. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? by Akehc99 (49 points, 27 comments)
  6. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? by piltonpfizerwallace (48 points, 31 comments)
  7. What do most Economists think about The Economist? by Traveledfarwestward (48 points, 26 comments)
  8. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? by gh0bs (45 points, 32 comments)
  9. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? by deleted (43 points, 5 comments)
  10. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? by Turnt_Up_For_What (42 points, 24 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  2. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  3. 59 points: RedditUser91805's comment in The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be?
  4. 58 points: arctigos's comment in What do most Economists think about The Economist?
  5. 55 points: hbtn's comment in Why are Little Caesar's cheese pizzas the same price as its pepperoni pizzas?
  6. 54 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Could someone explain the wage gap and whether it's a myth or not.
  7. 51 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
  8. 51 points: RedditUser91805's comment in You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy?
  9. 51 points: smalleconomist's comment in What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background?
  10. 49 points: TheoryOfSomething's comment in Which parts of Marxism are theoretically dependent on the labor theory of value and which are not?
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[Table] IAmA full-time Bitcoin day-trader, blogger, and explainer. I was a pro TCG player. Here until Midnight EST. AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-02-20
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
Let's say someone was looking for a stay at home computer job, would you recommend doing what you do? Is it something you can hop into, or is it something a lot of time must be put into before considerable income comes? You handle risk and pressure well, and you don't let your emotions guide your decision-making. Professional Poker and TCG players often develop this skillset.
You have experience working with stocks, bonds, derivatives, foreign exchange, or other financial instruments. If you have a strong mathematical background, that would also likely fulfill this.
You can invest significant capital into trading while remaining financially secure if it all suddenly vanishes.
You are capable of constantly monitoring a situation, waking up in the middle of the night if an alarm goes off, etc. It requires serious dedication.
You are good at keeping up with news, understanding market psychology, and "feeling" shifts in attitude and perception among other market participants.
Of those, I'd be most cautious if you don't meet no. 3. Going bust is a real possibility--day-trading a volatile commodity is inherently extremely high-risk. Nos. 2 and 4 are the easiest to learn or force through routine. No. 1 requires a person who approaches things in an emotionally detached manner. No. 5 is something that comes with investing enough time.
Second question: I'm answering this after that big block of text because this answer will come off like a get-rich-quick scheme. Yes, you can hop into it very quickly, and you can start making very high profits very quickly. I put in a small initial investment to test the waters, and made 10% on it in a few days. If you have the right skillset, composure, and resources, yes. It is a potentially very lucrative and exciting stay-at-home job. It is not for everyone, though.
As much as it would be beneficial for me (being in the industry and all), to tell everyone it's easy and that it will help them provide for themselves I feel that people need to know the real risks that are involved. Regardless, that's all a little irrelevant. We're not playing the house, and we're not flipping coins. We're playing other investors, and we're making actual decisions. You keep saying things like "98% lose money" and "Go onto any FOREX forum, and you will see from the users posts that they pretty much all lose money" but you don't back it up. Cool, yeah, it's a zero-sum game with a rake: a little more than half of the players will lose. That's expected. They'll probably complain about it, too, huh?
Retrospect can have a very positive effect. Got any real account trading statements I can have a look at? Let's see how fast you can come up with excuses not to show me ;) I only have and need one: I have chosen not to disclose my personal valuation for privacy reasons. Same reason I've had all along. I instead publicly disclose my trades, as they happen, on my website. The posts are timestamped, and the ones that are the start of a position contain the price I entered at. Go check the posts, then go check the charts, then go check my archive. But feel free to continue to arbitrarily call my credibility into question--that makes your argument better!
What leverage do you use? In Australia the leverage is typically 100:1, perhaps that's why your not seeing how risky I deem it to be. First, our argument so far has had nothing to do with risk. Second, I told you I am leveraged 2.5:1, two posts ago. Third, you realize I'm trading Bitcoin, not ForEx, correct? And that no one in their right mind would offer 100:1 leverage on Bitcoin due to its volatility?
What's your last year's hourly salary? A year ago I was finishing up college and extricating myself from the TCG business I'd co-founded. I took very little in take-home pay over that period, but kept part ownership of the continuing business. Money isn't just about the number on your bank account--it's also about residual future income.
How many hours a week are you typically on a computer? On a computer, probably 50-55, if you add in time I spend on my phone, I'd say 65-70. Day trading takes constant watchfulness. I imagine it's like an easier version of taking care of a baby.
What are your favorite to sources of news besides waiting for it to get to the front/hot page of /Bitcoin when it's several hours old? I have an IFTTT for /BitcoinMarkets and /Bitcoin that notifies me early on about some posts.
What's the weirdest thing about your mom? She started a bookselling business online in her 50s and makes more money than me.
Or.
She's a little old lady who loves gadgets and technology.
What are your thoughts on Dogecoin and other bitcoin competitors? Do you think any have staying value? LTC.
DOGE.
NXT.
VTC.
Coins that offer something different or that have a strong community to them can be valuable prospects.
LTC is the first-mover scrypt coin - DOGE has the most non-techies interested in its success and is spreading quickly as a result - NXT is a cool generation two coin that has a lot of features BTC doesn't have - VTC is ASIC-resistant
Ok, let me spell it out to you. The retail forex market only makes up 5% of the total forex markets liquidity. The other 95% is from hedge funds and institutions. Therefore, 99% of the retail market losing their money is very possible, as that only makes up 4.95% of the whole market. Is it possible that 4.95% of the market generally loses? Yes. How is that infeasible? Nope. That's a false equivalence. It is possible that 4.95% of the market loses. It is not feasible, that, say, 99% of people with blue eyes lose. What, exactly, in empirical terms, is the difference between retail investors and hedge/institutions that causes this INCREDIBLE disparity? Would you care to respond to my above empirical argument that demonstrates that a zero-decision system is flipping a losing coin? Do you consider it feasible for 99% of people playing a 45-55 game to lose?
Are there options and/or futures markets for Bitcoin? Not really yet, but there will be more prominent ones soon. I hear about a new one pretty regularly, it seems, but nothing that seems truly legitimate has come out. I'm certainly excited for them, though.
Eventually, once Mr. Lawsky and co. get things sorted out, I'm certain we'll see a big-name investment bank start offering them.
From the time you started trading until today, what is your overall percentage return? In USD, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 300% over a little more than 2 months.
In BTC, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 425% over a little more than 2 months.
Using my average per-coin buy-in price, if I had just bought-and-held, I would have lost about 27% of my initial investment value.
Ben, i told you I'd be here and asking about Hearthstone first. If there's one class that needs a bit of tuning, up or down, which is it and why? I think Mage needs basic, class-level tuning. I'm not sure what needs to be done exactly, but I don't like what the Mage class power does to gameplay. I've thought some about how different it would be if it could only hit minions, and I'd want to know if Blizzard had tried that out. The Mage power is too versatile, and over the long-term I think it will prove to be problematic.
What's your favorite card? Lord Jaraxxus is my favorite card. He has a truly legendary feel to him when you play him, but your opponent can still win, even though he's very powerful.
So, where do you think we go from here? I'm currently short, but I don't expect to be so for a lot longer. I don't think we'll get past 550. I also don't expect this drop to hold on for a really long time.
I haven't seen a good, substantive rationale for what the MtGox situation really has to do with Bitcoin price. Yes, it looks bad, it certainly doesn't help with our legitimacy, but is it really worth the incredible price declines we continue to see? I don't think so. I think we are seeing these impressive declines because the price on MtGox (which is a reflection of trust in MtGox relative to Bitcoin price, not just Bitcoin price) has been declining heavily. I don't expect it to continue forever, especially not with things like the Winkdex and the accompanying ETF launching.
MtGox is basically dead to me, for now at least. The sooner everyone stops paying attention to it, the sooner we can all get back on track, which I, for one, will be quite happy about.
Do you think that it's a good thing for a game when the developers of that game discourage certain playing styles (e.g. mill decks or decks that try to win in unconventional manners) whether in hearthstone, MTG, or other TCGs? It can be. I don't want the developers metaphorically over my shoulder outlawing strategies, but I don't mind if the strategies that are "less fun" for your opponent (Draw/Go, Mill, or Hard Combo from MTG, for example) are also less powerful. Most players prefer a game where the best decks are also among the most fun, because it means that they are playing against fun decks more often. Clearly the 2-cost 3/3 will be played most often. If you fix this by making both 2-cost guys 2/2s or 3/3s, or by making one a 2/3 and the other a 3/2, then you've done something--but it's not that interesting. If you instead make the 2-cost 2/2 have text that says "While you control the 3-cost 3/3, this gets +2/+2" and you give the 3 cost 3/3 text that says "While you control the 2-cost 2/2, it has Taunt" you now have more complex cards that reward players for doing something other than just playing the best stand-alone card.
Which do you think is a better option to encourage diversity in TCGs; improving/buffing cards/decks that hardly see any play versus weakening/nerfing cards that are overwhelmingly played? This is obviously a very simplistic example, but I hope it makes the point. Games are more fun when you give players more relevant choices: buffing and nerfing cards tends not to do that as well as promoting synergies does.
Where/what is the actual money behind bitcoin? If it does exist. You might need to rephrase your question for me to understand what you're asking. If you're asking why a Bitcoin has value, the answer is the same as any other good: because someone is willing to pay it.
If you're asking why someone is willing to pay that amount, my answer would be utility.
I just got started on Bitfinex (using your referral link) and am a little intimidated. What types of trades would I recommend I try as a beginner? From there, just keep careful watch, and see what happens. Be neutral and objective toward your own hypothesis, just like in science. Don't be biased by your hopes, be focused on the reality.
So far I've only done a liquidity swap offer to try it since it seemed (nearly) risk free. Have you done any liquidity swap or is it too low in profit? If I'm not going to be able to check my computer for a day or two, or I'm uncertain of what's going to happen the next few days, I do use the liquidity swap function. It's actually very profitable, relative to traditional investments. And you're right, it is low-risk. I'm a fan. Good job selecting it if you were intimidated--that's a good place to start. As far as actually starting trading, do science. Start with a hypothesis. If you were up at 5 AM today when MtGox published their announcement, a good hypothesis might have been something like: "This announcement is going to be a blow to their credibility, and might panic the markets. We'll probably drop by some amount as a result." Invest based on it, figure out around what price you want to take profits, and at what price you'll cut your losses and get out. Stick to those determinations unless something substantive changes. The time you tell yourself you can afford to not close your position because it will "rebound" back to where you want is also the time you lose your shirt.
Is it true that you like Balloons? No, I <3 them.
Lol to the question about your mom... Ben, from my understanding Bitcoin is anonymous, does this mean that you can avoid taxation when receiving payment? Bitcoin isn't anonymous. That's actually a common misconception. It's actually pseudonymous, like Reddit. You end up with an online identity--a wallet address--that you use with Bitcoin.
If I walk up to you on a street corner and buy Bitcoin with cash, then I'm pretty much anonymous. If I buy it from a large institution like Coinbase or some other company, they will have records of the address my Bitcoin was bought for. As a result, you can trace them down, generally speaking.
As for avoiding taxation, that's a general no.
What do you think Bitcoin's biggest hurdle is and how do you think it can be overcome? Are there any misconceptions about Bitcoin that you think people have? The biggest hurdle for Bitcoin to overcome is governments. Governments have a variety of reasons not to want an alternative currency. We seem to have done pretty well on that front here in the US, but for other countries (China) that is not the case. Past that, the other major hurdle is something I consider an inevitability: consumer adoption. Business adoption has begun in earnest, consumer adoption hasn't. It will when enough businesses take Bitcoin to give it sufficient utility for the average customer.
What trading platform do you use to daytrade Bitcoin? What is the standard margin that Bitcoin brokers offer? what's the typical ask/bid spread? I primarily use Bitfinex.
Very few Bitcoin brokers currently offer leverage, Bitfinex offers 2.5:1. Over time, I anticipate it will become more like current Forex, where 10:1 or greater leverage is common.
It varies by exchange depending on their fees. Huobi charges 0% fees, so their spread is generally tiny. Some exchanges can be as wide as 1.5%. Typically, I see spreads between .5 and .7%.
Do you invest in any other type of cryptocurrency? if so, which is your favorite besides bitcoin? I currently have no other holdings, but I've held DOGE and LTC at points and am considering VTC and NXT. DOGE is probably my favorite, because if the community can keep this up for a little longer it will snowball into amaze.
Can you trade me a Jace? TMS WWK, TMS FTV, Beleren, MA, or AoT?
Beleren. M10, M11, LOR, JVC, JVCJPN, or Book Promo?
M10 and if not possible then M11. Sure.
I've been reading your blog for quite some time and especially like your summaries for recent events. Keep up the good work! Do you use strict stop-loss orders for your trades? When do you decide to close a trade? Especially in situations where you can basically see you profit/loss grow by the minute. When is enough? Do you have a longterm bitcoin investment you don't touch or do you use everything you have for trading? I do use relatively strict stop losses, but they're not stop loss orders. My conditions usually aren't just the price hitting a certain point, but instead it sustaining for a brief period, or hitting it with a certain volume, or with a certain amount of resistance to retreat. I don't want my stop loss to be triggered by some idiot who dumps 300 BTC and temporarily drops the price 15, but only ends up really dropping it 3. I am very strict with myself about this, though, generally speaking--if I can't trust promises I make to myself, what good am I?
Let's say for example you have a sum x dollar and a sum y bitcoin on your trading account. How much % of x or y do you risk at every trade? I've seen a formula for the max. amount of investment and read numerous times that traders shouldn't risk more than one or two percent of their "bankroll". Do you generally have dollar and btc or just one of them at any given time? 100% of funds in every trade, so long as all funds are easily moved into the position. Common exceptions are lack of liquidity and funds being on other exchanges. My reasoning for being all-in all-the-time is that it's a profit-maximizing move. It is also risk-maximizing. My risk tolerance is infinite; most people's isn't. Only ever one. Generally BTC if I'm long, dollar if I'm short. I prefer to double-dip, as otherwise it would be in contradiction to the 100% plan. I use everything I have for trading. Again, profit-maximization, infinite risk tolerance.
I decide a closing price when I'm near either my stop loss or my profit aim. I place a limit order or multiple limit orders wherever I need to. I avoid market orders whenever possible. Enough is when I hit my goals or my loss tolerance. I decide these at the start, but I frequently re-evaluate them as news and market conditions develop.
What is a typical bid/ask spread for Bitcoin? It depends what exchange you're looking at, but generally .5-.7%.
What's the best way to popularize Bitcoin among the masses? Add your own but would love your thoughts on: -microtransactions developing nations -gift economy (tipping) I would suggest just running around shouting "You get to be your own bank" is probably the best way.
In all seriousness, though--we don't need to try. It's going to happen on its own from now on, as the news media slowly starts to pick up the story. People will start appearing on TV talking about it with more and more frequency. Things like the Dogelympic teams are great PR and help boost it up, as well, of course, but in general it's just going to follow the adoption curve of every other technology.
If it picks up in a few developing nations that have stable internet, it will be a massive revolution for them. Self-banking can do a huge amount of good for an economy like theirs. We might see reports on that. If a major newspaper decides to run a permanent paywall like what the Sun-Times tested recently, that could be big as well. The slow PR from tipping on Reddit is another way, to be honest. Every bit helps, but the cryptocurrency community is now large enough that we're going to do a significant amount of organic, word-of-mouth style growth.
Do you think that a magic game could beat harthstone? If they do a good job, absolutely. They have to focus on the right things. It needs to be mobile-available, easy to pick up and play, and fun.
Is there a good crypto currency to get in on now, before it explodes like bitcoin did? There are plenty of options. Check out coinmarketcap.com. Fair warning, there are plenty of horrible things there--treat it kind of like penny stocks. I like BTC, LTC, DOGE, NXT, and VTC.
Also, why is it such a pain in the ass to buy them with actual money? Like you have to have bitcoins to buy other crypto currency. It's such a pain to buy them with USD because no one has made a good system to do it on, like Coinbase. If you think there's a desire, go do it!
Well the way I look at it, is how the hell else would you be able to buy them? Not everyone has piles of bitcoins lying around and I really don't want to spend $600+ on a single bitcoin just to buy some other currencies. Ah, I see the problem! You can buy fractions of a Bitcoin using Coinbase--I think .01BTC (~$6) is their minimum.
The March 2013 appreciation was from American and European investors and November 2013 was mainly from Chinese investors. Which group of people do you think will be the next to buy (I hate using the word invest when talking about bitcoin) bitcoin for investment purposes? American institutional and hobby investors. That is, Wall Street and people who pay attention to Wall Street.
Which do you think will be a better long term (~5 years) investment, Bitcoins, Litecoins, Dogecoins, Fetch Lands, Shock Lands, or Original Dual Lands? Does it change for ~10 years? Either Bitcoin or Fetch lands for 5 years. For 10 years, Bitcoin. I'd be worried about the 10-year view for paper MTG.
Ive been mining Bitcoins for years now, i have a good sum im my wallet but i never plan to use them. Does this make me a bad person? Approximately yes.
Ben, I should've simultaneously copied and pasted all of my questions from the Spreecast over to here but here are a few... It seems like the conspiracy crowd has really latched onto the idea of Bitcoin as being a discreet form of currency. If Bitcoin is backed up by the internet why would people choose having a currency that's being tracked over say cash, gold, different commodities? Having a currency be tracked has negatives and positives, but it's overwhelmingly positive for the average consumer. Because it's tracked, you don't need to pay someone to move your money for you. There also are no chargebacks, which means merchants aren't getting scammed and passing those costs onto consumers. Theft costs everyone money. It's also very fast--transactions confirm in just 10 minutes, regardless of size or where it's going. Transferring dollars from here to China is very difficult--transferring Bitcoin? Just as easy as from anywhere else to anywhere.
My job is a mix of voodoo, intuition, science, and news. In USD, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 300% over a little more than 2 months.
No, just gambling. In BTC, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 425% over a little more than 2 months.
Anyway, how have the profits been from start to finish compared to the market? Using my average per-coin buy-in price, if I had just bought-and-held, I would have lost about 27% of my initial investment value.
Are you willing to disclose how much you have in your trading portfolio/what kind of profit you turn both % and $ wise? In USD, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 300% over a little more than 2 months.
In BTC, my percentage return calculated from investment to current valuation is about 425% over a little more than 2 months.
Using my average per-coin buy-in price, if I had just bought-and-held, I would have lost about 27% of my initial investment value.
What would you say is the easiest method of shorting bitcoin or any other coin? For shorting Bitcoin or Litecoin, check here.
For other coins, there isn't really a good way yet, to the best of my knowledge. A few exchanges have plans to add short-selling, but Bitfinex is really the only one I know of that has.
What did you have for breakfast today. Didn't breakfast, was delicious.
Hey Ben, I know next to nothing about Bitcoin. I went to /bitcoin after seeing this AMA on your FB, and I noticed that everyone is going apeshit over "Gox". I have no idea what that means or why everyone is so sad/angry/suicidal. MtGox (which originally stood for Magic the Gathering Online eXchange) was the first prominent Bitcoin exchange. They've been going through some rather rough times lately, some of which I was an early cataloguer of here. In short, everyone is freaking out because the exchange may be insolvent. It's not really a big deal to Bitcoin as a whole, but it's certainly an obvious blow to credibility. In my view, people are primarily upset because MtGox has been a part of Bitcoin for a very long time, and it can be hard to let go of what we're used to. I expect that they will either fix the issues or will go out of business officially very soon.
Please explain what happened.
Tell me every artist in your iTunes. Daft Punk, detektivbyrån, Kid Cudi, Matisyahu, The White Panda.
Spotify for life, yo.
Follow up question, what % are you in BTC vs Fiat and when you are on the losing side of a trade do you find your self dumping in more to get right or do you pull the cord Unless my positions are on different exchanges or in different coins, they're all always 100% of what I'll put into that trade at entrance and exit. As a result, I end up with a binary choice: stay or reduce/close. I very rarely reduce position size, nearly always preferring to just end the position instead.
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10 of the most common misconceptions of day trading…. Misconceptions about Forex Misconceptions about FOREX 🥶 - YouTube 7 Misconceptions About Forex Trading - YouTube Misconceptions about FOREX 🥶 - YouTube

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10 of the most common misconceptions of day trading….

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